Where is Saint Vincent and the Grenadines located?

What countries border Saint Vincent and the Grenadines?

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Weather

What is the current weather in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines?

Find more about Weather in Arnos Vale, VC
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Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Facts and Culture

What is Saint Vincent and the Grenadines famous for?

  • Family: Women are at the center of family life in St. Vincent and the Grenadines. They are responsible for raising children,... More
  • Fashion: Modern Western style clothing is worn especially light bright-colored clothes. Most children wear uniforms to school. More
  • Recreation: Cricket and soccer are popular in St. Vincent. The islands' coastlines and beaches provide a natural environment for water sports.... More
  • Diet: People from St. Vincent begin their mornings with “tea,” which refers to a variety of hot beverages such as coffee,... More

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Facts

What is the capital of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines?

Capital Kingstown
Government Type parliamentary democracy (House of Assembly) under a constitutional monarchy; a Commonwealth realm
Currency XCD
Total Area 150 Square Miles
389 Square Kilometers
Location Caribbean, islands between the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean, north of Trinidad and Tobago
Language English, French patois
GDP - real growth rate 2.1%
GDP - per capita (PPP) $11,000.00 (USD)

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Demographics

What is the population of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines?

Ethnic Groups black 66%, mixed 19%, East Indian 6%, Carib Amerindian 2%, other 7%
Nationality Adjective Saint Vincentian or Vincentian
Nationality Noun Saint Vincentian(s) or Vincentian(s)
Population 101,390
Population Growth Rate -0.3%
Population in Major Urban Areas KINGSTOWN (capital) 31,000
Predominant Language English, French patois
Urban Population 49.3%

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Government

What type of government does Saint Vincent and the Grenadines have?

  • Executive Branch: chief of state: Queen ELIZABETH II (since 6 February 1952); represented by Governor General Susan DOUGAN (since 1 August 2019) head... More
  • Suffrage: 18 years of age; universal More
  • Citizenship: citizenship by birth: yes citizenship by descent: at least one parent must be a citizen of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines dual... More
  • National Holiday: Independence Day, 27 October (1979) More
  • Constitution: several previous; latest passed by the House of Assembly 3 September 2009 (The Saint Vincent and The Grenadines Constitution Act,... More
  • Independence: 27 October 1979 (from the UK) More

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Geography

What environmental issues does Saint Vincent and the Grenadines have?

  • Climate: tropical; little seasonal temperature variation; rainy season (May to November) More
  • Environment - Current Issues: pollution of coastal waters and shorelines from discharges by pleasure yachts and other effluents; in some areas, pollution is severe... More
  • Environment - International Agreements: party to: Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol, Desertification, Endangered Species, Environmental Modification, Hazardous Wastes, Law of the Sea, Marine... More
  • Terrain: volcanic, mountainous More

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Economy

How big is the Saint Vincent and the Grenadines economy?

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines News & Current Events

What current events are happening in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines?
Source: Google News

Interesting Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Facts

What unique things can you discover about Saint Vincent and the Grenadines?

  • A popular delicacy on St. Vincent is tri tri, a tiny fish that hatches in the sea, then migrates upstream. In hatching season, people flock to the mouths of rivers to catch the tri tri. After cleaning, the fish are seasoned with spices and curry powder and fried into cakes.
  • Among Vincentian students attending university and college, female students outnumber males almost three to one.
  • Calypso songs have influenced St. Vincent politics. In 1984, when the ruling party was running for re-election, a critical song called 'Horne fuh dem' (Horn for Them) by calypso musician Beckett helped bring about the party's defeat.
  • Ferries, supply boats and airplanes run daily between St. Vincent and the larger Grenadine islands. Some of the Grenadines depend on supply boats for almost everything except supplies of fish.
  • May 1 or Lab our Day is also known as Fishermen's Day on St. Vincent. Fishermen participate in fishing and net-mending contests.
  • Radiocarbon evidence suggests that eruptions of La Soufrière occurred as early as 160 A.D. The volcano's repeated activity has created 'dry rivers' such as the Wallibou and Rabacca. These rivers were so choked with volcanic matter that they were driven underground, although the riverbeds remain.
  • Some families operate banana farms. A family can make a living from only a few acres of banana trees. Farmers sell their crops each weekend at the Kingstown market.
  • St. George's Anglican Cathedral in Kingstown contains a stained glass window called the Red Angel. The window was originally commissioned by Queen Victoria for St. Paul's Cathedral in London, but was rejected because the angel was portrayed in a red garment. The Queen thought that angels wear only white.
  • The Caribs, who lived in St. Vincent before its colonization, called the island Yurumein, which means 'the beauty of the rainbows in the valleys.' Another Carib name for the island is Hairoun, meaning 'and of the blessed.'
  • The descendants of people deported from St. Vincent by the English, known as the Garifuna, still live in Honduras, Belize, Guatemala and other areas of Central America, where they maintain a distinct cultural identity.
  • The first breadfruit tree was brought to St. Vincent from Tahiti by Captain Bligh in 1793 when he was returning from his second Tahitian voyage. During his first voyage, he was set adrift after the famous mutiny on his ship, the Bounty.
  • The pollution of the water surrounding the islands is both an environmental and a health concern. Caused primarily by pleasure yachts, pollution has affected the shorelines of all the major islands and is so severe that, in certain areas, swimming is dangerous.
  • The uninhabited Tobago Cays have been made into a National Marine Park. The shallow-water cays have an abundance of colorful marine life and are among the best snorkeling sites in the world.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Travel Information

What makes Saint Vincent and the Grenadines a unique country to travel to?

Country Description

St. Vincent and the Grenadines is an English-speaking developing Caribbean island nation. Tourism facilities are widely available.

Crime

Crimes of all types, including violent crime, occurs in St. Vincent and the Grenadines. From time to time, property has been stolen from yachts anchored in the Grenadines. Valuables left unattended on beaches are vulnerable to theft. Persons interested in nature walks or hikes in the northern areas of St. Vincent should arrange in advance with a local tour operator for a guide; these areas are isolated and police presence is limited.

Don’t buy counterfeit and pirated goods, even if they are widely available. Not only are the bootlegs illegal in the United States,you may be breaking local law too.

Criminal Penalties

While you are traveling in another country, you are subject to its laws even if you are a U.S. citizen. Foreign laws and legal systems can be vastly different than our own. In some places you may be taken in for questioning if you don’t have your passport with you. In some places, it is illegal to take pictures of certain buildings. In some places, driving under the influence could land you immediately in jail. These criminal penalties will vary from country to country. There are also some things that might be legal in the country you visit, but still illegal in the United States, and you can be prosecuted under U.S. law if you buy pirated goods or engage in child pornography. While you are overseas, U.S. laws don’t apply. If you do something illegal in your host country, your U.S. passport won’t help. It’s very important to know what’s legal and what’s not where you are going.

Persons violating St. Vincent and the Grenadines laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned. Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in St. Vincent and the Grenadines are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.

Medical Facilities and Health Information

Medical facilities are limited. The main hospital is Milton Cato Memorial Hospital (Telephone (784) 456-1185). This hospital is in the capital, Kingstown, but serious medical problems usually require evacuation to another island or to the United States. There is no hyperbaric chamber; divers requiring treatment for decompression illness must be evacuated from the island. The closest hyperbaric chamber is located in Barbados. Serious medical problems requiring hospitalization and/or medical evacuation to the United States can cost thousands of dollars. Doctors and hospitals usually expect immediate cash payment for health services.

Traffic Safety and Road Conditions

While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning St. Vincent and the Grenadines is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

Vehicles travel on the left side of the road. Roads are narrow, and generally poorly paved, with steep inclines throughout the islands. Taxis and buses are relatively safe, but buses are often overcrowded. Vans are generally overcrowded and frequently travel at high rates of speed. Night driving is discouraged in mountainous areas because the roads are not well marked; there are few, if any, guardrails, and roads are steep and winding.

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