Where is Kenya located?

What countries border Kenya?

Kenya Weather

What is the current weather in Kenya?


Kenya Facts and Culture

What is Kenya famous for?

  • Food and Recipes: Afternoon tea is a daily custom throughout the country. Depending on the type of food, people may eat their food... More
  • Family: The family unit usually includes the extended family. There is much interaction between uncles, aunts, and cousins. In fact, children... More
  • Fashion: Kenyans generally are modestly dressed. Shorts (for women) are generally only appropriate in resort areas. Women usually wear dresses,... More
  • Visiting: Visiting is often done unannounced with people often dropping by for a visit and a cup of tea. ... More
  • Recreation: Football (soccer) is the national pastime. School sponsored sports include soccer, and track and field. Urban Kenyans often become members... More
  • Cultural Attributes: Patriotism is evident in people’s respect for the national flag. When the flag is raised or lowered, Kenyans stop what... More
  • Dating: Men and women usually marry between the ages of eighteen and twenty-four. The dowry system, where a payment is made... More
  • Diet: Popular meats consumed are fish, lamb, goat, beef and chicken. Milk, "ugali" (dough made from cornmeal, sorghum or millet), "uji"(porridge... More

Kenya Facts

What is the capital of Kenya?

Capital Nairobi
Government Type presidential republic
Currency Kenyan Shilling (KES)
Total Area 224,080 Square Miles
580,367 Square Kilometers
Location Eastern Africa, bordering the Indian Ocean, between Somalia and Tanzania
Language English (official), Kiswahili (official), numerous indigenous languages
GDP - real growth rate 6.5%
GDP - per capita (PPP) $3,300.00 (USD)

Kenya Demographics

What is the population of Kenya?

Ethnic Groups Kikuyu 22%, Luhya 14%, Luo 13%, Kalenjin 12%, Kamba 11%, Kisii 6%, Meru 6%, other African 15%, non-African (Asian, European, and Arab) 1%
Languages English is an official language and is widely used, especially for business and official purposes. However, Kiswahili (also called Swahili) was proclaimed the national language after independence and is therefore also official.

One of the reasons Kiswahili is not a difficult language is that it's pronunciation never changes from word to word. A as the ‘a’ in ‘father’, E as the ‘e’ in ‘best’, or the ‘a’ in ‘hay’ , I as the ‘ee’ in ‘bee’, O as the ‘o’ in ‘cold’, U as the ‘ou” in “you”, Dh as the ‘th’ in ‘this’, Ng’ as the ‘ng’ in ‘sing’.
Nationality Adjective Kenyan
Nationality Noun Kenyan(s)
Population 53,527,936
Population - note note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates, lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected
Population Growth Rate 2.27%
Population in Major Urban Areas NAIROBI (capital) 3.363 million; Mombassa 972,000
Predominant Language English (official), Kiswahili (official), numerous indigenous languages
Urban Population 24%

Kenya Government

What type of government does Kenya have?

  • Executive Branch: chief of state: President Uhuru KENYATTA (since 9 April 2013); Deputy President William RUTO (since 9 April 2013); note -... More
  • Suffrage: 18 years of age; universal More
  • Citizenship: citizenship by birth: no citizenship by descent only: at least one parent must be a citizen of Kenya dual citizenship recognized: yes residency... More
  • National Holiday: Independence Day, 12 December (1963); Madaraka Day, 1 June (1963); Mashujaa Day (or Heroes' Day), 20 October (2010) More
  • Constitution: previous 1963, 1969; latest drafted 6 May 2010, passed by referendum 4 August 2010, promulgated 27 August 2010 More
  • Independence: 12 December 1963 (from the UK) More

Kenya Geography

What environmental issues does Kenya have?

  • Overview: The northern and eastern three‑fifths of the country are arid. The southern two‑fifths, where most of the population and nearly... More
  • Climate: Nairobi has four seasons, but overall temperature changes are moderate. Mid‑ December through March are mainly sunny and warm by... More
  • Border Countries: Ethiopia 861 km, Somalia 682 km, Sudan 232 km, Tanzania 769 km, Uganda 933 km More
  • Environment - Current Issues: water pollution from urban and industrial wastes; degradation of water quality from increased use of pesticides and fertilizers; water hyacinth... More
  • Environment - International Agreements: party to: Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol, Desertification, Endangered Species, Hazardous Wastes, Law of the Sea, Marine Dumping, Marine... More
  • Terrain: low plains rise to central highlands bisected by Great Rift Valley; fertile plateau in west More

Kenya Economy

How big is the Kenya economy?

  • Economic Overview: Kenya is the economic, financial, and transport hub of East Africa. Kenya’s real GDP growth has averaged over 5% for... More
  • Industries: small-scale consumer goods (plastic, furniture, batteries, textiles, soap, cigarettes, flour), agricultural products processing; oil refining, cement; tourism More
  • Currency Name and Code: Kenyan Shilling (KES) More
  • Export Partners: Uganda 18.5%, UK 13%, US 8.1%, Netherlands 7.6%, Pakistan 5%, Egypt 4.1% More
  • Import Partners: UAE 12%, Saudi Arabia 8.7%, South Africa 8.1%, US 8.1%, UK 7.1%, France 5.8%, China 5.5%, Japan 5%, India 4.8% More

Kenya News & Current Events

What current events are happening in Kenya?
Source: Google News

Interesting Kenya Facts

What unique things can you discover about Kenya?

  • At Easter Kenya hosts the annual Safari Rally, which, along with the Paris-Dakar Rally, is one of the toughest and most exciting automobile rally events in the world.
  • The highest point of Kenya's highlands is Mt. Kenya, which is over 5000 meters.
  • In 1985, Kenya hosted the third International Women's Conference.
  • Kenya is one of the main producers of pyrethrum which is a mosquito repellent. It comes from a plant which people burn to ward off mosquitoes.
  • Kenya took home eight track and field medals from the 1996 Summer Olympics.
  • Kenyans have created highly artistic dances that are performed during ceremonies at birth celebrations, marriages and funerals.
  • Kenyans make batik cloth using banana bark in mosaic-like patterns. Kenyans are famous for their elaborate and colorful artistry.
  • Most Kenyans visit a government clinic when they are sick. These clinics are free, but the patient has to pay for medicines and bandages.
  • Storytellers in Kenya are highly respected. Children learn traditions, history and lessons by listening to people tell the many different folktales, legends and myths of the Kenyan culture-or just stories of a person's past. Many Kenyans in rural areas don't have television-or even electricity-so children often gather in the evening in the home of a good storyteller.
  • The Mau-Maus formed as a religious and political group to fight for their religious and cultural traditions. In the 1950s they fought the Mau-Mau rebellion, rejecting British religions and rule.

Watch video on Kenya

What can you learn about Kenya in this video?

Africa - Into The Wild - VenTribe YouTube, Devin Graham

Kenya Travel Information

What makes Kenya a unique country to travel to?

Country Description

Kenya is a developing East African country known for its wildlife and national parks. The capital city is Nairobi. The second largest city is Mombasa, located on the southeast coast. Tourist facilities are widely available in Nairobi, the game parks, the reserves, and on the coast. English and Kiswahili are Kenya’s two official languages.

Crime

Violent and sometimes fatal criminal attacks, including armed carjackings, grenade attacks, home invasions and burglaries, and kidnappings can occur at any time and in any location. U.S. citizens, including U.S. Embassy employees, have been victims of such crimes within the past year. Crime is high in all regions of Kenya, particularly Nairobi, Mombasa, Kisumu, and at coastal beach resorts. There are regular reports of attacks against tourists by groups of armed assailants. Pickpockets and thieves carry out "snatch and run" crimes on city streets and near crowds. Visitors have found it safer not to carry valuables, but rather to store them in hotel safety deposit boxes or safe rooms. However, there have been reports of safes being stolen from hotel rooms and hotel desk staff being forced to open safes. Walking alone or at night, especially in downtown areas, public parks, along footpaths, on beaches, and in poorly lit areas, is dangerous and discouraged.

Nairobi averages about ten vehicle hijackings per day and Kenyan authorities have limited capacity to deter and investigate such acts. Matatus (public transportation) tend to be targeted since they carry up to 14 passengers. Although these attacks are often violent, victims are generally not injured if they do not resist. There is also a high incidence of residential break-ins and occupants should take additional security measures to protect their property. Thieves and con artists have been known to impersonate police officers, thus U.S. citizens are strongly encouraged to ask for identification if approached by individuals identifying themselves as police officials, uniformed or not. U.S. citizens have fallen victim to such crimes within the past year. U.S. citizens in Kenya should be extremely vigilant with regard to their personal security, particularly in public places frequented by foreigners such as clubs, hotels, resorts, upscale shopping centers, restaurants, and places of worship. U.S. citizens should also remain alert in residential areas, at schools, and at outdoor recreational events.

Thieves routinely snatch jewelry and other objects from open vehicle windows while motorists are either stopped at traffic lights or in heavy traffic. Vehicle windows should be up and doors locked regardless of the time of day or weather. Thieves on matatus, buses, and trains may steal valuables from inattentive passengers. U.S. citizens should guard their backpacks or hand luggage and ensure these items are not left unattended. Purchasing items from street vendors is strongly discouraged – visitors should only use reputable stores or businesses. Many scams, perpetrated against unsuspecting tourists, are prevalent in and around the city of Nairobi. Many of these involve people impersonating police officers and using fake police ID badges and other credentials. Nevertheless, police checkpoints are common in Kenya and all vehicles are required to stop if directed to do so.

Highway banditry is common in much of Mandera, Wajir, Garissa, Marsabit, and northern Tana River counties, as well as Turkana county. These areas are remote and sparsely populated. Incidents also occur occasionally on Kenya's main highways, particularly after dark. Due to increased bandit activity, air travel is the recommended means of transportation when visiting any of the coastal resorts north of Malindi. Travelers to North Eastern Kenya and the North Rift Valley Region should travel with police escorts or convoys organized by the government of Kenya.

There have been reports of armed banditry in or near many of Kenya's national parks and game reserves, particularly the Samburu, Leshaba, and Masai Mara game reserves. In response, the Kenya Wildlife Service and police have taken steps to strengthen security in the affected areas, but the problem has not been eliminated. Travelers who do not use the services of reputable travel firms or knowledgeable guides or drivers are especially at risk. Safaris are best undertaken with a minimum of two vehicles so that there is a backup in case of mechanical failure or other emergency. Camping alone is always risky.

The Kenyan mail system can be unreliable and monetary instruments (credit cards, checks, etc.) are frequently stolen. International couriers provide the safest means of shipping envelopes and packages, although anything of value should be insured.

Do not buy counterfeit and pirated goods, even if they are widely available. Not only are the bootlegs illegal in the United States, if you purchase them you may also be breaking local law.

Criminal Penalties

While you are traveling in Kenya, you are subject to its laws even if you are a U.S. citizen. Foreign laws and legal systems can be vastly different than our own. In some places, you may be taken in for questioning if you do not have your passport with you. In some places, it is illegal to take pictures of certain buildings. Driving under the influence could land you immediately in jail. There are also some activities that might be legal in Kenya, but illegal in the United States, and you can be prosecuted under U.S. law. For example, engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime prosecutable in the United States. If you break local laws in Kenya, your U.S. passport will not help you avoid arrest or prosecution. It is very important to know what is legal and what is not where you are going.

Persons violating Kenya's laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking illegal drugs in Kenya are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Kenya has recently enacted strict legislation regulating the sale and consumption of alcohol and cigarettes. Please see the Special Circumstances section below.

Arrest notifications in host country:

Kenya is a signatory to the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations (VCCR), and is required by the VCCR to ask any detained U.S. citizen if he/she would like the U.S. Embassy to be notified and to contact the U.S. Embassy if the detained U.S. citizen requests it. Kenya does not routinely comply with its VCCR obligation. Any U.S. citizen who is detained should request U.S. Embassy notification if he/she would like consular assistance. U.S. citizens are encouraged to carry a copy of their U.S. passport with them at all times, so that proof of identity and U.S. citizenship is readily available if questioned by local officials.

Languages

English is an official language and is widely used, especially for business and official purposes. However, Kiswahili (also called Swahili) was proclaimed the national language after independence and is therefore also official.

One of the reasons Kiswahili is not a difficult language is that it's pronunciation never changes from word to word. A as the ‘a’ in ‘father’, E as the ‘e’ in ‘best’, or the ‘a’ in ‘hay’ , I as the ‘ee’ in ‘bee’, O as the ‘o’ in ‘cold’, U as the ‘ou” in “you”, Dh as the ‘th’ in ‘this’, Ng’ as the ‘ng’ in ‘sing’.

Medical Facilities and Health Information

Adequate medical services are available in Nairobi. Frequent outbreaks of cholera and malaria are endemic in Kenya outside Nairobi. In addition, diseases such as Ebola, Rift Valley Fever, and anthrax from handling sheep skins occur periodically. Travelers, who become ill with a fever or flu-like illness while traveling in a malaria-risk area, and up to one year after returning home, should seek prompt medical attention and tell the physician their travel history and what anti-malarial drugs they have been taking. For additional information on malaria, protection from insect bites, and anti-malarial drugs, please visit the CDC Travelers' Health web site.

Tuberculosis is an increasingly serious health concern in Kenya. For further information, please consult the CDC's Information on TB.

On May 17, the CDC issued a Travel Notice regarding an outbreak of dengue in Mombasa, Kenya’s second-largest city and a major tourist destination. Dengue is spread by mosquitoes, and travelers to Kenya’s coastal areas should plan to protect themselves from mosquito bites through covering exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats, and using insect repellent as directed on the packaging. For more information on dengue, please visit the CDC web page on dengue.

The CDC issued a Travel Notice on June 3, regarding the recent diagnosis of polio in Kenya. All travelers to Kenya and surrounding countries should be fully vaccinated against polio. In addition, adults previously vaccinated as children should receive a one-time booster dose of polio vaccine.

Safety and Security

All travelers to Kenya should review the Department of State’s Travel Warning for Kenya that provides detailed information about security issues affecting the country. Though thousands of U.S. citizens visit Kenya safely each year, the U.S. government continues to receive information regarding potential terrorist threats aimed at U.S., Western, and Kenyan interests in Kenya. Terrorist acts could include suicide operations, bomb and grenade attacks, kidnappings, attacks on civil aviation, and attacks on maritime vessels in or near Kenyan ports. Although there have been recent gains in the pursuit of those responsible for previous terrorist activities, many of those involved remain at large and continue to operate in the region. Travelers should consult the Worldwide Caution on the Travel.State.Gov website for further information and details.

Kenya initiated military action against al-Qaida affiliate al-Shabaabby crossing into Somalia on October 16, 2011, and, on June 2, 2012, signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) whereby it formally joined the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM). Kenyan troops within AMISOM are now actively pursuing al-Shabaab in southeastern Somalia. In response to the Kenyan intervention, al-Shabaab and its sympathizers have conducted retaliatory attacks against civilian and government targets in Kenya.

In the past year, there have been numerous attacks involving grenades or explosive devices in Kenya. At least 76 people died in these attacks, and around 220 people were injured. No U.S. citizens were among the casualties. Approximately twenty-five of these attacks occurred in North Eastern Province, mainly in Dadaab, Wajir, Mandera, and Garissa. Four attacks occurred in Mombasa. Twelve grenade and improvised explosive device (IED) attacks have occurred in Nairobi, illustrating an increase in the number of attacks and an advance in the sophistication of attacks. Targets included police stations and police vehicles, nightclubs and bars, churches, a mosque, a religious gathering, a downtown building of small shops, and a bus station. One of the deadliest attacks occurred in Nairobi on November 18, 2012, when an IED detonated on a passenger bus in Eastleigh, killing ten. Seventeen people were killed and about 50 people were injured in a deadly attack on July 1, 2012, with two simultaneous assaults on churches in Garissa. Additionally, Kenyan law enforcement has disrupted several terrorist plots, which resulted in the discoveries of weapons caches and other dangerous materials, and the arrests of several individuals. Multiple kidnappings of Westerners have occurred in Kenya.

In September 2011, a British woman was kidnapped and her husband murdered at a coastal resort near the Kenya-Somali border. The British hostage was released in March 2012 after payment of ransom. In October 2011, a French national was kidnapped from a private residence on the popular tourist destination of Lamu Island on Kenya's north coast. She died while in captivity in Somalia. Also in October 2011, two Spanish nationals working for a NGO were kidnapped in Dadaab refugee camp, in northeastern Kenya. They are still being held. On June 29, 2012, four international aid workers (from Canada, Pakistan, Norway, and the Philippines) were kidnapped in Dadaab. All were rescued on July 1, 2012.

Following a series of security incidents attributed to violent extremists, including al-Shabaab, the Government of Kenya announced on December 13, 2012 that all urban refugees (primarily Somalis) should relocate to refugee camps. This directive is being challenged in court and is not currently being enforced; however, U.S. citizens of Somali descent should be aware that they may encounter interruptions in their travel due to increased police scrutiny based on the directive. It is very important to carry proof of identity and legal status in Kenya (e.g., valid visa). If you are detained by police or immigration officials, you should request to speak to someone from the Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi.

As a result of these recent events and threats, U.S. government employees, contractors, grantees, and their dependents are prohibited from traveling to the cities of El Wak, Wajir, Garissa, Mandera, and Liboi. U.S. government personnel are restricted from traveling to the coastal area north of Pate Island, including Kiwayu and north to Kiunga on the Kenya/Somalia border.

Although these restrictions do not apply to travelers not associated with the U.S. government, U.S. citizens already in Kenya should take these restrictions into account when planning trips. The Embassy regularly reviews the security of these areas for possible modification.

Clashes occasionally occur in and around Isiolo and Moyale and in 2012 there were numerous instances of sporadic violence and protests elsewhere in the country. Rioting occurred in Mombasa shortly after a local Muslim cleric with alleged ties to al-Shabaab was killed in a drive-by shooting, resulting in the deaths of three policemen and four church burnings. Demonstrations in Kisumu following the murder of two prominent Kenyan citizens in October 2012 turned violent, leaving at least four protestors dead. More than 160 people were killed in clashes in late 2012 between two communities in Tana River County. While this violence is not directed at foreigners, protests and ethnic clashes are unpredictable. U.S. citizens are advised to check conditions and monitor local media reports before traveling to these areas.

Villagers in rural areas are sometimes suspicious of strangers. There have been several incidents of violence against Kenyan and foreign adults in rural areas who are suspected of stealing children. U.S. visitors to rural areas should be aware that close contact with children, including taking their pictures or giving them candy, can be viewed with deep alarm and may provoke panic and violence. Adoptive parents traveling with their adopted child should exercise particular caution and are urged to carry complete copies of their adoption paperwork with them at all times.

Travelers should keep informed of local developments by following local press, radio, and television reports prior to their visits. Visitors should also consult their hosts, including U.S. and Kenyan business contacts, hotels, tour guides, and travel organizers.

Traffic Safety and Road Conditions

Road Conditions and Safety: Road accidents are a major threat to travelers in Kenya. Roads are poorly maintained and are often bumpy, potholed, and unpaved.

• Traffic moves on the left side of the road, which can be very disorienting to those not accustomed to it.

• Beware of vehicles traveling at excessive speed, and unpredictable local driving habits.

• Many vehicles are poorly maintained and lack basic safety equipment.

• Heavy traffic jams, either due to rush hour or because of accidents, are common.

• Some vehicles will cross the median strip and drive against the flow of traffic.

U.S. citizens have been fatally injured in accidents involving long-distance, inter-city buses and local buses and vans called “matatus”. Matatus are commonly known to be the greatest danger to other vehicles and pedestrians. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from using matatus.

Injuries and fatalities involving two-wheeled motorcycle taxis, called “boda bodas,” are equally common. Boda bodas often fail to observe basic safety precautions and ignore traffic rules. Inter-city nighttime road travel should be avoided due to the poor road and streetlight conditions and the threat of banditry throughout the country. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from using boda bodas.

During the rainy season, some unpaved roads are impassable even with four-wheel drive vehicles with high clearance. Travelers are urged to consult with local officials regarding road conditions.

Most passenger trains are considered unsafe, particularly during rainy seasons, because of the lack of routine maintenance and safety checks. The only approved train route for U.S. government personnel is the SGR from Nairobi to Mombasa. However, passengers should ride only in the first-class cabin to avoid pickpockets and facilitate a rapid exit if necessary.

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