Thailand Places to Visit

Phanom Rung Phanom Rung Historical Park or Prasat Hin Phanon Rung is a key location in Buriram, Thailand. It has many important archaeological sites, which are located at the top of an extinguished volcano 350 meters above seal level. On this now dormant Volcano you will see incredible Khmer architecture, which is assumed to have been built in the 15th - 18th Buddhist century. Here you can marvel at the giant stairways of red stone and sandstone. The long story of Prasat Hin Phanom Rung is part of Thailand history.
Thailand
The Grand Palace Located at the heart of Bangkok, Thailand, the Grand Palace was a former residence for King Rama I to King Rama V of the Rattanakosin Kingdom. Today, the place is used for hosting royal ceremonies and welcoming the king’s guests, State guests, and other foreign dignitaries. It is also a place where remains of kings and high-ranked members of the royal family were situated before cremation.

The Grand Palace is divided into two main zones, which are the Temple of the Emerald Buddha and the royal residence. The latter is divided into three major areas: the Outer Court, the Middle Court, and the Inner Court. The Outer Court starts from Wiset Chai Si Gate to Phiman Chai Si Gate and includes the inner walls of the Grand Palace. It is now the location of several state offices such as the Bureau of the Royal Household, Office of His Majesty’s Principal Private Secretary, and the Office of the Royal Institute.

The Middle Court starts from Phiman Chai Si Gate to Sanam Ratchakit Gate. The area is where significant royal ceremonies are held such as the Royal Coronation and the Royal Ceremony of Coronation Day. Situated in the Middle Court area are the Phra Maha Monthien Buildings, the Chakri Maha Prasat Buildings, the Phra Maha Prasat Buildings, and the Siwalai Gardens quarter. The Inner Court starts from Sanam Ratchakit Gate to Thaew Teng, the row houses which were formerly palace walls during the reign of King Rama I. The southern area of the Inner Court was then a female-only zone; no man except for the king was allowed to get into the area, where the queens, consorts, consort mothers, and daughters of the king lived together with many ladies-in-waiting and servants. The area no longer served as a residence nowadays.

Phranakorn, Bangkok
Wat Phra That Doi Suthep Wat Phra That Doi Suthep is the most important temple in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Built in the early 19th Buddhist century, the beauty of Wat Phra That Doi Suthep is marked by seven-headed serpent statues that line the stairs to the temple where a Chiang Saen style golden pagoda and all its exquisite Lanna architecture is situated. The view of Chiang Mai from here is just phenomenal as well. At Wat Phra That Doi Suthep they also have Tiaw Khuen Doi Festival, which is the travel up Doi Suthep Hill to worship the Buddhist relics enshrined there. It is an experience worth checking out. Wat Phra That Doi Suthep is located in Tambon Suthep, Amphoe Mueang, Chiang Mai Province.
Tambon Suthep, Amphoe Mueang, Chaing Mai
Bridge of River Kwai This steel bridge is one of important historical landmarks and memorials in Thailand. It is almost a symbol of the province and is a recommended place in Kanchanaburi travel guide. The history of the bridge is well known, as it was part of the railway lines in World War II and had seen its share of conflict and bloodshed. After World War II, the damaged bridge was renovated by the Thai government in 1946. The Bridge of the River Kwai Memorial Week is held during late November to early December every year, where there is an exhibition about World War II and the history and archaeology of the bridge. Folk performances, local goods markets, and other entertainment are also scheduled at the event. Situated not far from the bridge is Don Rak or Kanchanaburi War Cemetery, another important World War II-related place as it is where remains of the prisoners of war who had died while building the railway were buried.
Thailand
Wat Pho Wat Pho is not only one of the most visited Buddhist temples in Bangkok but it is where history, medical science and educational institute combined. Officially named Wat Prachetuphon Vimon Mangkararam, Wat Pho was believed to be founded during the 16th century and was later served as The Royal Temple of King Rama I of Chakri Dynasty. Laid inside the main ordination hall is the sacred 46-meter Reclining Buddha whose feet are beautifully inlaid with mother-of-pearl, carved with holy signs. Wat Pho is, among Thais, also known as “the nation’s first public university,” thanks to 1,360 marble inscriptions about medical, historical and liberal sciences places all around the temple where the people can read and learn anytime. Marble inscriptions about medical sciences, anatomy and orthopedics are the origins of Wat Pho Thai traditional massage principles, which has made Wat Pho a world’s famous site. The traditional service, nowadays, is also available at the nearby pavilion. in 2008, Wat Pho was listed UNESCO’s Memory of the World (MOW) as a documentary heritage for Asia and Pacific Region.
Maharat Road, Phra Nakorn District, Bangkok

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2019 edition